Conspiracy to commit journalism | Pressthink

Conversations at Stanley Park

Investigative journalism and the secret state are natural enemies. Even with an enlightened government and relatively untroubled times, their relationship will be uneasy at best.

Today, they’re in a state of undeclared war. Surveillance states and most of their fellow travellers are in too deep to pull back voluntarily. Some will be uneasy about how far things have gone but changing one’s mind is never a comfortable business, particularly if it has to be done in public.

Those opposed to overly intrusive and secret surveillance need to figure out the best ways to increase that uneasiness and offer palatable means for players to defect. The playing field needs to once again be tilted towards openness as the primary operating principle. To do that, unearthing secrets, valuable though it may be, is not enough.

It’s exactly these issues that Jay Rosen takes up in this recent piece at Pressthink.

A conspiracy…

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David Miranda, Picking Through The Issue

Soupy One

DM1There is considerable discussion of the detention of David Miranda and the lines are forming up.

On one side, those who seem to hate Glenn Greenwald and would probably justify any action against him or his partner, short of throwing them into Gitmo!

On the other, those concerned with the implications of the detention. I rarely find myself agreeing with Andrew Sullivan but he sums up the wider issue of Snowden’s exposé:

“Readers know I have been grappling for a while with the vexing question of the balance between the surveillance state and the threat of Jihadist terrorism. When the NSA leaks burst onto the scene, I was skeptical of many of the large claims made by civil libertarians and queasily sympathetic to a program that relied on meta-data alone, as long as it was transparent, had Congressional buy-in, did not accidentally expose innocent civilians to grotesque privacy loss, and…

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Guardian reporter Glenn Greenwald to be more aggressive in reporting leaks

Newsdesk International

The Guardian journalist, whose partner was detained by British authorities and questioned over the weekend said he plans to publish much more aggressively the documents leaked to him by whistleblower Edward Snowden.

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Greenwald tweet: 150 press freedom & human rights groups call for the end of US prosecution

Communications & Legal Studies

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Glenn Greenwald, Jeffrey Toobin Argue Over Bradley Manning Verdict

Media Politics in Perspective

By Jack Mirkinson

 

CNN’s Jeffrey Toobin argued fiercely with Glenn Greenwald about the verdict in the Bradley Manning trial on Tuesday’s “AC360.”

Manning was found guilty on 19 counts, including six counts of espionage, for his leaks to WikiLeaks, but was acquitted of the most serious charge of aiding the enemy. Press freedom groups immediately criticized the ruling, and others worried it could intimidate future leakers and whistleblowers.

Toobin, though, thought the judge, Col. Denise Lind, had gotten it right. He called Manning’s leaks “appalling,” adding, “he should be going to prison and he will be.”

Greenwald said Toobin’s remarks showed that “if you’re sufficiently rich and powerful and well-connected in Washington, the laws don’t apply to you. You don’t get punished. The only people who do are people like Bradley Manning.” He compared Manning to Bob Woodward, who publishes classified information all the time. Toobin said the…

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Jeffrey Toobin, Glenn Greenwald Debate Bradley Manning Verdict, Government Leaks (Video)

Left and Center

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CNN and New Yorker legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin and The Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald had a spirited debate Tuesday night on the verdict reached in the Bradley Manning trial, and government leaks in general.

Toobin began by admitting that the “aiding the enemy” charge — of which Manning was justly acquitted — was excessive, but went on to laud the verdict as a whole, one which will almost undoubtedly result in life in a military prison for Manning. Greenwald pulled no punches in his defense of Manning and government leaks, labeling it “bizarre” and “baffling” that someone who calls himself a journalist would openly call for the criminal prosecution — and indeed persecution — of such an important leaker.

“And the thing that I find most bizarre is that anybody who would go into the field of journalism or call themselves a journalist who would call for the prosecution and imprisonment…

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