Nicki Minaj: The Magazine Killer

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Do Nicki Minaj fans just not buy magazines?

Because according to the WWD’s annual newsstand roundup, she is “indisputably newsstand poison”.  That is quite the comparison, but it simply means that her popularity does not translate into magazine sales.

Appearing on the April cover of Elle and in Teen Vogue in June-July, Nicki’s covers sold the second fewest number of copies for both publications. New York magazine believes that the Elle cover had more to do with the “grungy” look given to the singer, and perhaps Teen Vogue readers are more interested in seeing boy bands on the cover (since One Direction was their best selling cover) than someone like Nicki.

However, having Beyonce on a magazine cover helps sales.  New York Magazine cites the popularity of her March Vogue cover, which sold 355,397 copies (even beating out first lady Michelle Obama)!

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Rolling Stone Founder Promotes 22 Year-Old Son To Run Website

Left and Center

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After a long, storied career as a college student, 22 year old Gus Wenner — son of Rolling Stone founder Jann Wenner — has been promoted to head up all operations at RollingStone.com.

Like nepotism? Take a big whiff.
Via JimRomenesko.com:

From: Jann Wenner
Date: Monday, May 20, 2013 2:52 PM
Subject: Gus Wenner

Dear all:

[Wenner Media chief digital officer] David Kang and I are very pleased — and I am very proud — to announce that Gus Wenner, after leading the re-launch re-design effort for our website, will now continue by heading up the overall operations of RollingStone.com.

Jann

Hopefully this doesn’t get in the way of Wenner’s and Scout Willis’ — offspring of John McClane and Demi Moore — alternative country band, affectionately called Scout + Gus.

Don’t let them change you Gus!

(Photo: Facebook.com)

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How Justin Smith remakes media companies — and why the Atlantic will be fine without him

Gigaom

In a media industry fraught with failure, almost everything touched by Justin Smith has turned to gold. That’s why news of his decision to leave Atlantic Media for Bloomberg led media pundits to heap praise on Smith and, more quietly, to wonder what will happen to the Atlantic without him.

Smith is best known for helping the 150-year-old publication embrace digital media and, in doing so, avoid a Newsweek-like descent into insolvency and irrelevance. While Smith’s reputation as a digital evangelist is well-deserved, it risks overshadowing his more fundamental talent: an ability to redefine what a media company is and how it should be run.

In early June, I had lunch with Smith and met Atlantic executives in their airy offices in the hulking Watergate building overlooking the Potomac. The visit revealed how Smith has rebuilt the company in such a way that it doesn’t depend on any one…

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