Perry Appoints Former Reporter New Chief Of Staff

CBS Dallas / Fort Worth

 

AUSTIN (AP) — Gov. Rick Perry has appointed a new chief of staff as he prepares for retirement.

Perry named former Houston Chronicle reporter Kathy Walt on Monday to manage his office. Walt previously worked for Perry’s press secretary when he took office in 2000. Most recently she’s worked for the Lower Colorado River Authority in charge of government relations.

The governor also named Jonathan Taylor to serve as director of the Economic Development and Tourism Division. Aaron Demerson will be a senior adviser for economic development.

Perry announced last month that he will not seek re-election. That gives him only 16 months left as governor.

Perry has held open the possibility of a second run for president in 2016. He has recently made high-profile appearances at national Republican events.

(© Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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“Scoop, if true”: How The New York Post Gave Up On Journalism Altogether

Left and Center

The New York Post is a groundbreaking news organization. Some magazines and newspapers waste time by vetting sources, checking facts, reporting on things that exist — you get the idea. 20130807-155530.jpg

Not the Post. They have no such time for that nonsense. I mean, why make yourself all tired and whatnot by finding sources when you can just have your readers tell you what’s what?

Take today’s column by Michael Goodwin for an example. Goodwin quotes one of his readers — again, who cares who he is, right? — who has a real life “scoop, if true”.

    Reader Don Reed has a scoop, if true. “People are going nuts trying to smoke out the identity of Eliot Spitzer’s clandestine girlfriend,” he writes. “I think it’s Huma.”

    Stop the presses!

Give the man a Pulitzer!

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‘El Tiempo Latino:’ What Jeff Bezos Was Really After…

Mi blog es tu blog

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As usual, the so-called “mainstream media” missed the boat on this one.

For all the hoopla around Jeff Bezos buying the Washington Post, most media writers failed to point out that the Post is the proud publisher of El Tiempo Latino, a weekly Spanish-language publication that prints awesome cartoons like this one and targets the many, many Latinos that are taking over D.C.

So… if you thought Bezos paid $250 million for The Washington Post, think again. What he was really after was the ever-exploding, trillion-dollar-opportunity that only Hispanic print media can deliver.

After all, there’s no point in denying his Cuban background, is there?

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The Era of Family Newspapers Is Back

Media Politics in Perspective

By Matthew Yglesias

Last Friday, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos sold a bunch of Amazon stock. On Monday afternoon, we learned why. Bezos is buying the Washington Post for $250 million. The news—combined with the sale of the Boston Globe over the weekend for $70 million to the quantitative trading pioneer John Henry—has prompted a fair amount of gnashing of teeth and rending of garments over the much higher prices fetched recently by Tumblr and Instagram, and of the possible trampling of American democracy by egomaniacal newspaper-buying billionaires. While it’s of course possible that Bezos will ruin the Post or turn it into some kind of adjunct to Amazon’s lobbying efforts, we should more likely see this as a positive development.

The most journalistically successful American newspapers have almost always been family affairs, conducted in part out of non-pecuniary motives. Conversely, the sky-high valuations given to social networking startups reflect the…

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The Amazon Post or Why Print Was Already Dead

HighTalk

AmazonPost2

One of my PR colleagues had this reaction to Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon.com, buying the Washington Post.

“This really is the end of an era for print media as we know it.”

My reaction?

Where have you been?

Print media, particularly print newspapers, official kicked the bucket in 2009 – after a long and agonizing death. In fact, 2009 was so painfully grim for print media that I dubbed it the year of the Great Media Collapse.

It was epic.

2009 ended with more than 14,000 journalism jobs gone forever. It ended with circulation rates at 1940s levels. It saw the end of dozens of newspapers including mainstay dailies in Tucson, Seattle, Detroit, Baltimore and Denver. Heck, in 2009, Businessweek was sold for less than the price of a really nice condo in Manhattan.

The situation has continued to deteriorate at a startling rate.

The Pew Research…

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Amazon’s Jeff Bezos to buy Washington Post

Phil Ebersole's Blog

Jeff Bezos, the founder and chief executive of Amazon, will buy the Washington Post for $250 million.  I suppose it is not as bad as the Post being bought by the Koch brothers or Rupert Murdoch.  We’ll see.

Bezos’ politics might be described as Silicon Valley liberalism.  He is a champion of gay rights, but not in the right of his employees to decent working conditions.

I worked on newspapers for 40 years, and liked to believe that journalism was a calling and more than just a way for journalists to earn a salary and owners to earn a profit.

Most (not all) of the historically great American newspapers were owned by families who believed in the newspapers’ mission, rather than by corporations whose main business was elsewhere.

Bezos will own the Washington Post as an individual and incorporate it into Amazon, so he doesn’t fall into either category.  It…

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