The Guardian Takes NSA Coverage to Twitter’s new Timelines; Politico Creates Energy Insider Tweet Hub

Twitter How to TweetWhen Twitter rolled out its custom timelines Tuesday, two major media outlets were already taking advantage of the new features.

The Guardian used a custom timeline to conduct a Q&A with readers about its recent NSA coverage. And Politico put together a list of tweets related to energy policy.

My first impression is that The Guardian came up with the more interesting use for custom timelines. But I’m also uncertain whether either feature was particularly new, or if custom timelines just offer a different way to do something media outlets have been doing without the new feature.

I’ll have more to say about this later as I explore custom timelines on my own. But in the mean time, this is a sample of what The Guardian did. I’ve also included a simple screen-shot of the Politico “Energy Insider Tweet Hub” brought to you by Chevron.

I’m less impressed with what Politico has done here. This kind of looks like three lists anyone might have been able to create on Twitter before the custom timelines became available. Also, they lose points for allowing an energy company to sponsor their timelines about energy policy.

Politico Energy Insider

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Conspiracy to commit journalism | Pressthink

Conversations at Stanley Park

Investigative journalism and the secret state are natural enemies. Even with an enlightened government and relatively untroubled times, their relationship will be uneasy at best.

Today, they’re in a state of undeclared war. Surveillance states and most of their fellow travellers are in too deep to pull back voluntarily. Some will be uneasy about how far things have gone but changing one’s mind is never a comfortable business, particularly if it has to be done in public.

Those opposed to overly intrusive and secret surveillance need to figure out the best ways to increase that uneasiness and offer palatable means for players to defect. The playing field needs to once again be tilted towards openness as the primary operating principle. To do that, unearthing secrets, valuable though it may be, is not enough.

It’s exactly these issues that Jay Rosen takes up in this recent piece at Pressthink.

A conspiracy…

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David Miranda, Picking Through The Issue

Soupy One

DM1There is considerable discussion of the detention of David Miranda and the lines are forming up.

On one side, those who seem to hate Glenn Greenwald and would probably justify any action against him or his partner, short of throwing them into Gitmo!

On the other, those concerned with the implications of the detention. I rarely find myself agreeing with Andrew Sullivan but he sums up the wider issue of Snowden’s exposé:

“Readers know I have been grappling for a while with the vexing question of the balance between the surveillance state and the threat of Jihadist terrorism. When the NSA leaks burst onto the scene, I was skeptical of many of the large claims made by civil libertarians and queasily sympathetic to a program that relied on meta-data alone, as long as it was transparent, had Congressional buy-in, did not accidentally expose innocent civilians to grotesque privacy loss, and…

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Guardian reporter Glenn Greenwald to be more aggressive in reporting leaks

Newsdesk International

The Guardian journalist, whose partner was detained by British authorities and questioned over the weekend said he plans to publish much more aggressively the documents leaked to him by whistleblower Edward Snowden.

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Snowden in Moscow, the end of Week Five

eats shoots 'n leaves

An irony-laced wrap-up from Russia Today on America’s Most Wanted. . .

Leaker’s Labour’s Won: Snowden’s 5 week airport limbo as it was

The program notes:

One chapter in Edward Snowden’s saga was closed this week. The US whistleblower on-the-run has finally left the transit limbo of a Moscow airport, where he’s been stuck for more than a month. Snowden’s been granted temporary asylum in Russia — and has already received some job offers, including one from Russia’s biggest social network. While his whereabouts at the moment remain unknown, RT’s Lindsay France recaps the media’s chase for the former NSA contractor.

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Debate over NSA programs gets renewed attention amid terror threat

CNN Security Clearance

By Ashley Killough

There’s no proof that the current terror threats in the Middle East, North Africa and beyond were uncovered through a federal program that monitors domestic telephone data, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-California, who serves on the House Intelligence Committee, said Sunday.

“There’s no indication, unless I’m proved wrong later, that that program which collects vast amounts of … domestic telephone data contributed to information about this particular plot,” Schiff said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

The scope of the secret program set off a political firestorm over civil liberties when a leaked document detailing it was published this summer. Officials say the program only collects metadata of domestic phone calls – under federal court permission – not actual conversations.

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